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to get it out of them, right? what goes on behind the curtain? john dickerson, cbs news. >> don't forget slate go too. ' and again the best online magazine other than the atlantic, slate. >> i can't tell whether we are in the living room or a therapy room. >> we've got 20 minutes until the show departs for i hope can tune or something. let's start with both of you on the candidates in the last campaign and now we are here for this one. one was different this time around? >> nothing. [laughter] >> you know, it was entirely different from the beginning. there is a lot that has been written about what was different. of course in the first campaign there was this amazing wave of excitement and enthusiasm and many people were projecting what they wanted the than candidate senator obama to be. and this time there was no question it was hard fought. there were harder days. there wasn't a wave at the end as we all know. a very i will call him very senior administration officials said to me, which i think this is a very good analogy for it that the first campaign was like being in a relationship
dickerson, cbs news. [applause] ape the best online magazine flate. >> thank you. i can't tell whether we're in a living room or sthurp room. either up with of you want to lie down >> airport lounge. we have twenty minutes until the shuttle departs for can ciewn or something, i hope. let's start with both of you work for the candidates in the last campaign, you are now here for this one, jen, what was different? >> nothing. [laughter] just kidding. it was entirely different from the beginning. there's a lot that's been written about how it was different. of course, you know, the first campaign there was this amazing wave of excitement and enthusiasm and many people were projecting what they. ed then. candidates senator obama to be. this time was no question harder fought. there were harder days. there wasn't a wave at the end as we know. a very, i'll call him, a very, very senior administration official said to me, i think it's a good analogy for it. the first campaign being like in a relationship. everything is gleeful and happy and don't see any wrong in the other person, and, you know,
. ken follett speaks with charles osgood, anchor cbs news sunday morning at it historical society in new york city. >> good evening to all of you. we were told ten and to go -- i have to say i know you from so many years of reading your terrific books. most of the people here tonight, tremendous pleasure. one critic -- being able to get lost in a wonderful story and come out days or weeks later feeling something you didn't before. i appreciate what you do so much. in day today journalism we are in awe of something historical, a trilogy, this is a tiny little piece, i learned on the cbs morning news that you too are in day-to-day journalism until your car broke down. >> close to the truth. my first job as a newspaper reporter, i worked for the south wales -- my home town newspaper. i work for a london paper, the evening news and it is true that my car broke down and i couldn't afford to get it fixed and i went to the bank and asked them, i needed 200 pounds. quite a lot of money in those days and asked the bank for a loan and they said no. a colleague on the newspaper had written a thrill
or the cbs evening news, there is a basic impulse on the part of the anchor and the reporters to tell it straight. but cable is where you are getting the opinion. this is your getting the opinion also on the networks so everybody is running around in a circle pointing fingers of everybody saying you are not admitting it. estimate it isn't so much a matter of the bias that the networks. the problem is they simply are not putting the money into the kind of news coverage that is vital to democracy. the money would help in that for one thing you would open up when has the world ever been in your experience and more dangerous place than it is right now? i happen to believe it's the worst times in the cold war. we are the brink of nuclear war with the cuban missile crisis the the fact of the matter there was a balance between the great. these days we need information from the third world more than we ever needed it before. we don't have the reporters out there. >> that's absolutely true. i'm sorry to say at this particular time that we have run out of time which is the relentless clock as r
joined abc news in 1963 could i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right come together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. that's enough to depress anybody. [laughter] so, ted, what in god's name have we learned about our craft of journalism in all of these things? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans finally realize how bad things are and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think that may be a resurgence of the kind of journalism that you and i grew up with. >> that is a marvelous very optimistic. >> actually it's a very terrible thought because it suggests the ship almost has to sink before people are willing to jump back into the lifeboats. >> but do you think that we can truly even define journalism? if somebody walked into the room right now and said what are they talking about? journalism. explain it to that guy. >> i think the simplest way to explain it is to to get back to when you and i were young and what you and i be
. but when "the new york times" or cbs reports that conversation or talk by lindsey graham, they see lindsey graham said i do want to raise taxes. full stop. and the rest of the conversation disappears. so the challenge and, i say this was leaked, i don't think he intended to have a public conversation but if you say things in front of 150 people -- >> and it was in an interview. >> then he meant to get it out. but by doing that than, all they did was have a conversation about other ways to raise taxes. if you are trying to figure how to rein in spending, we are sitting here talking, a handful coming in, as you say over 90% of republicans have taken the pledge. they all kept by the way. given all this talk but somebody might break the pledge. a handful of people have in your thoughts that under certain circumstances speed is what do you mean by in your thoughts because meaning they haven't -- >> this is a family event, be careful. >> they been think that maybe voting for tax increases. they haven't done it. >> is that what republicans to? >> they don't think about this. a few of them talk ab
, oops, didn't come out that way. in new hampshire, well, i won't run them all of these, but cbs harangued them, saying, you conceived, you lost the election. i don't think i lost. they counted the votes, and he was not losing. when have the polls mistakenly said the republican is winning? [laughter] really, i'm not much worried about the exit polls. >> oh, good, i thought you meant the ten point spread was in our favor, but it's in in the 2008 election was in obama's favor? >> i don't remember that exact column. >> i remember them all. >> better than i do apparently. [laughter] >> ann, in light of yesterday's oral arguments of the supreme court, university of texas case. what do you think is the possibility and probability of ending affirmative action in education? >> well, i hope very good. my law firm brought the case gebs the -- against the university of michigan and law school. we brought that original case ten years ago, won against the law school, lost against undergrads because of sandra day o'connor who says we need 25 more years of affirmative action. now we have consti
you're frustrated to watch the daily news. will broadcast medium abc, cbs, nbc, cnn, fox, any thing with 9/11 or terrorism always guilty before you are proven innocent and rush to judgment. the reporting is not in depth. the problem media faces with the original foreign correspondent. they will living there they come back with the real story. with the arabs spring it was the beginning of the revolution now it was a different story because now we use youtube or bad quality television. but it depends. you can still read fantastic stories and use the terrible reporting on stations like fox news. >> how would arab media of fact -- defect or handle the matters in media? i suspect americans to enjoy positioning the and it was before. why is that? the palestinian issue the front pages was day touching point* because of the support for israel so i see the criticism. president obama also helped the american administration in. something interesting, burning the american flag, you could see that in syria. or the chinese flags. have the iranians, russians, now being burned regular the. governme
into the following interesting. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. i mean, that's enough to depress anybody. so ted, what in gods name hauber learned about our sacred craft of journalism in all these years? >> i think we've learned not to make addictions. >> so what are you predict in? >> i predict your title, provocative as it may be may be premature. i think when americans finally realize how bad our what terrible straits our political system is in, i think may be a resurgence of the kind of journalism you and i grew up with. >> of the marvelous, optimistic style. >> actually it's a terrible thought because it suggests a shift of the date is almost going to have to sink before people are going to jump back into the lifeboat. >> t. think we can truly define journalism? if somebody walked in the room right now from mars and set but are these guys talking about? journalism, explain to that guy. >> it is to take it back when you and i were young and when you and i began this busines
, michael here as well joining us, going to be speaking on "the new new deal: hidden story of change in the obama administration,ed" leadoff speaker is "bailout: how washington abandoned main street while rescuing wall street," give a big round of applause, and cbs 4 has been here for years, and great to have these guys joining us today. take it away, thank you so much. [applause] >> thank you so much, and thank you, everyone, for coming out, and thank you for my co-panelists, an unbelievable thrill that's hard to put into words. here we are after days after the most recent presidential election, and it's hard to believe that it was really four years ago as we were -- at least i was celebrating the first lexes of then senator barack obama as president of the united states of america, and, you know, as a country, it was a remarkable time. it was a different election. in the midst of a financial crisis, a crisis -- i forgot my clock, otherwise i would go on for 45 minutes. [laughter] a financial crisis that really started here in the united states, but brought almost the entire global
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10